Here are some quick tips when you consider framing design.  There are sometimes exceptions, but these give you a good place to start.

Tip #1

Mat Border Proportions:

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Mat border widths change in popularity like other style trends.  The current style is the use of wider borders than were typically used 20 years ago.
Today we recognize that wider mat margins provide visual breathing room around the art and enable you to focus on the art itself much more easily.

 

Tip #2

When you use no mat, consider a wider frame

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When you don”t use a mat, you may need to achieve visual separation from your surroundings with a wider frame.  With a narrow frame and no mat the surround can look skimpy and insufficient to hold up the design.

Tip #3

Why Use a Mat on a Picture?

MCPF
Master Certified Picture Framer

Matting has both an aesthetic and a functional purpose! It provides a spacer to protect paper art or photographs from direct contact with the glass. This is necessary to prevent the art from coming in contact with condensation or sticking to the glass and being permanently damaged.

One or more mats can provide depth, width and color to your framed art. Two or more mats give your framed piece a three-dimensional look. This can enhance depth that the artist intended to create in the original work.

Artwork needs some space or visual “breathing room” around it to prevent distractions from the surrounding wall treatment. Mats provide this visual “breathing room,” allowing your art to be seen clearly.

Mat boards now come in hundreds of colors, textures and appearances. The choice of mat colors can be used to achieve several benefits. Carefully chosen mats can often enhance the artwork, while providing a transition to the room’s decor. Fabric mats can be used to add texture to your art. Mats covered in silk or smooth linen achieve elegance and add importance to your art.

Tip #4

How to Clean Picture Frame Glass?

Most commercial window cleaners, without Ammonia, are good for cleaning framing glass. Avoid all-purpose cleaners, disinfectants, or any cleaner that contains pumice, waxes, or harsh detergents. You should avoid using anything with ammonia (Note that some commercial glass cleaners do contain ammonia). Window cleaners with vinegar or vinegar-D work great, and tests indicate that they are safe for any glass.  You should ALWAYS spray the cleaner on the cloth, then wipe the glass. Otherwise, if you spray directly on the glass, the liquid is likely to run down between the frame and glass, and could eventually wick up into the framing package and damage mats and potentially the artwork.

Tip #5

Matting Combinations:

Matting has aesthetic and functional purpose! It provides a spacer to protect paper art or photographs from direct contact with the glass. This is necessary, particularly in humid climates, to prevent the art from coming in contact with condensation or sticking to the glass and permanently damaging it.One or more mats can provide depth, width and color to your framed art. Two or more mats give your framed piece a three-dimensional look. This can enhance depth that the artist intended to create in the original work.

Artwork needs some space or “breathing room” around it to prevent distractions from the surrounding wall treatment. Mats provide this visual “breathing room,” allowing your art to be seen clearly.

Mat boards now come in hundreds of colors, textures and appearances. The choice of mat colors can be used to achieve several benefits. Carefully chosen mats can often enhance the artwork, while providing a transition to the room’s decor. Fabric mats can be used to add texture to your art. Mats covered in silk or smooth linen achieve elegance if your decor is more formal.

Tip #6

An ounce of prevention:

Many times cherished art is damaged prior to arriving at the frame shop because it is improperly stored or transported. If it’s a rolled piece such as a poster, serious damage can be caused by rubber bands, tape, paperclips and even a gentle squeeze. Make sure that the artwork is placed in a folder, protective covering , or a tube.  When lifting a piece of paper art, including photographs, always use two hands.  Lifting paper with one hand can cause “half moon” shaped creases in the paper.  Try to lift the paper by opposite corners.

Tip #7

Selecting a Frame:

Larson-Juhl Academie

The frame provides structural strength to enable you to cover your art with glass or acrylic and to hang it. But the color, styleand texture of the moulding adds its own ingredient to the recipe of your custom-framed art. We have a huge variety of mouldings available (over 2500), but your choice should coordinate with the art, the mats, and the particular effect you desire to achieve. For example, a bamboo-like moulding might be great for oriental work, or a “Taos” weathered look works well for southwestern art. Mouldings made from natural woods and finishes are often used to coordinate with similar wood furnishings and to provide a “simple elegance” to the art.